Dec 13, 2017 Culture

The 24 Best Romantic Comedies We Can't Stop Watching

by Hadley Mendelsohn

What would life be without romcoms? Probably a lot less interesting and a lot less upbeat. Though the genre itself has become something of a trope, the best romantic comedies are so much more than fluff. Whether you're already a romcom devotee or you need a little extra convincing, our watch list of the best romantic comedies will make those quiet nights in a whole lot better. With 24 films in the spotlight, plus four more similar movies under each, you'll want to start planning your next viewing party. With 120 movies total, we included retro classics, quirky indies, and contemporary hits so everyone can find something they'll love to watch (and rewatch) depending on their sense of humor and what they find romantic. Click through to reminisce about your favorites or discover new ones to add to your collection.

Roman Holiday ($4)

Gregory Peck and Audrey Hepburn are the ultimate on-screen couple. Though he really made us fall in love with him as Atticus Finch, we also swooned over him in Roman Holiday, and of course, Audrey Hepburn is as charming and elegant as ever. She plays a modern-day princess who sets out on her own to explore Rome and meets Peck along the way.

There's More Where That Came From: Sabrina, Breakfast at Tiffany's, Bringing Up Baby, and High Society.

The Kids Are All Right ($4)

Clever, relatable, sweet, and full of lessons, The Kids Are All Right is easily one of our favorite romcoms. It stars Julianne Moore, Annette Bening, and Mark Ruffalo, which speaks for itself. Watch this if you love family dramas.

There's More Where That Came From: My Sister's Sister, August: Osage County, As Good as It Gets, and The Descendants.

The Graduate ($3)

Watch the iconic love affair unfold while listening to a dedicated Simon & Garfunkel score and laughing at dry satire that still resonates today. There's a fun "forbidden love" angle, but it's a lot more playful than straight-up drama films about this topic.

There's More Where That Came From: Annie Hall, Rumor Has It, Hannah and Her Sisters, and Nobody Walks.

The Big Sick ($6)

Kumail Nanjiani is easily one of the funniest actors around, and though he delivered plenty of laugh-out-loud jokes in The Big Sick, it's also fun to catch him in more tender moments as his relationship develops rather unconventionally. If you didn't get to see this autobiographical movie in theaters, it's definitely worth watching at home.

There's More Where That Came From: Landline, Ira & Abby, Safety Not Guaranteed, and Happythankyoumoreplease.

500 Days of Summer ($7)

The viewer sees little bits and pieces of Summer (Zooey Deschanel), a happy-go-lucky woman who doesn't believe in love, but only through the perspective of Tom (Joseph Gordon-Levitt). He's smitten with her, but what happens when you fall in love with someone who simply doesn't believe in it?

There's More Where That Came From: Celeste and Jesse Forever, Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist, Youth in Revolt, and Ruby Sparks.

Amélie ($8)

Amélie is a unique movie, so if you're in the mood for something funny and romantic but prefer avant-garde films, this will hit the spot. Following a young woman in Paris with hints of magic realism—it's a fresh take on the classic love story.

There's More Where That Came From: Dancer in the Dark, Girl on a Bicycle, In a World, and Last Love

Pretty Woman ($4)

The most epic rags-to-riches story ever (sorry, Benjamin Franklin), if you haven't watched Pretty Woman at least once, drop everything you're doing and start streaming it now.

There's More Where That Came From: Dirty Dancing, Coyote Ugly, The Wedding Date, and Grease.

How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days ($4)

This Kate Hudson–Matthew McConaughey is a quintessential romcom. As the title implies, this movie is about a magazine editor assigned to write a first-person editorial about what it takes to scare off a potential partner. But not everything goes as planned…

There's More Where That Came From: While We're Young, Sweet Home Alabama, Just Married, and The Break-Up

Juno ($4)

Featuring what is perhaps the best script and soundtrack ever, Juno is one of those movies you'll watch again and again. It traces a 16-year-old as she navigates her unplanned pregnancy, as well as her relationship with her equally charming family, friends, and boyfriend.

There's More Where That Came From: Knocked Up, Away We Go, Adventureland, Baby Mama, and Charlie Bartlett.

Her ($4)

Though there's a despondent feel to this film, it's punctuated with enough laugh-out-loud moments to deserve a spot on the list of best romcoms. Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix) roams around a slightly future iteration of Los Angeles while adjusting to life post-divorce and while falling in and out of love with his personalized operating system, Samantha (Scarlett Johansson).

There's More Where That Came From: Blue Jasmine, Only Lovers Left Alive, The One I Love, and The Lobster.

This Is Where I Leave You ($4)

Expect nothing but the best from a movie starring Tina Fey, Jane Fonda, Jason Bateman, Adam Driver, and Rose Byrne. Though four grown siblings are brought together under the sad circumstance of their dad's passing, this movie is full of silver linings, laughs, and relatable offbeat family dynamics.

There's More Where That Came From: Our Idiot Brother, The Skeleton Twins, Admission, and The Giant Mechanical Man.

Dope ($4)

A sweet coming of age movie about a self-proclaimed geek senior in high school (he's actually way cooler than any high schooler we've ever met), watch this if you feel like a pick-me-up about friendship and new belonging.

There's More Where That Came From: Mistress America, Superbad, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, and Little Miss Sunshine.

Weekend ($4)

At the heart of it, this film is about self-discovery, romance, and finding beauty even in the most ordinary moments. It's a bit of a slow burner and more of a drama than a comedy, though there is definitely some wit and intelligent humor sprinkled throughout.

There's More Where That Came From: Blue Is the Warmest Color, Call Me By Your Name, Moonlight, and A Bigger Splash.

Love Actually ($4)

Even though you probably already watch this movie every year when the holidays roll around, we couldn't help but include it on our list of the best romantic comedies. It's super upbeat, and each of the seemingly separate love stories it follows is adorable.

There's More Where That Came From: The Family Stone, The Holiday, Four Christmases, and Bridget Jones's Diary.

Hitch ($4)

A suave modern-day matchmaker coaches his dorky friend to help him win over his love interest while pursuing his own. And of course, he's nowhere near as smooth in his personal life as when he's coaching others. It's a fun watch about how the beginning stages of relationships tend to be full of awkward and goofy (but endearing) moments.

There's More Where That Came From: The Proposal, The Wedding Planner, What Women Want, and Bedazzled.

It's Complicated ($4)

Out of all the subgenres, we love the romcoms that spotlight empowered divorcees, especially when the star is Meryl Streep. Oh, and it doesn't hurt when mouthwatering pastries get a lot of screen time, either. Consider this the grownup version of The Parent Trap.

There's More Where That Came From: Something's Gotta Give, Stuck in Love, No Strings Attached, and Julie and Julia.

Beginners ($4)

Here's another film that portrays the ways in which coping with loss can overlap with encountering love, as unexpected as it may seem. Mélanie Laurent and Ewan McGregor, Christopher Plummer, and even the dog will captivate you in this smart, innovative, and fresh romantic comedy.

There's More Where That Came From: Somewhere, Like Crazy, and Me and You and Everyone We Know, and Paper Heart.

Vicky Cristina Barcelona ($8)

Two American friends, Vicky (Rebecca Hall) and Cristina (Scarlett Johansson), travel to Barcelona for the summer and both fall for a dreamy local artist (Javier Bardem). The feeling is mutual, but he also still has a thing for his ex (Penelope Crúz), so lots of relationship dynamics unfold.

There's More Where That Came From: Before Sunset, Midnight in Paris, New York Stories, and Lost in Translation.

Frances Ha ($13)

This movie (which is comprised of grainy, low-contrast shots and quotable moments) is about the lasting strength of female friendship and platonic love. We witness two young people living in Brooklyn as they figure out who they want to become, both together and apart.

There's More Where That Came From: Lola Versus, Lady Bird, Tiny Furniture, and The Obvious Child.

How Stella Got Her Groove Back ($4)

This is one of those movies that will give you serious wanderlust. Stella (Angela Bassett), takes a trip to the Bahamas and finds herself on what turns out to be much more than just a relaxing vacation. It's a fun watch and also gives voice to the internal dilemmas we wrestle with about desire and passion versus responsibility and convention.

There's More Where That Came From: Eat Pray Love, What's Love Got to Do With It, Before Sunrise, and Under the Tuscan Sun.

When Harry Met Sally ($4)

If someone's ever asked you whether or not you think men and women can be "just friends," you probably have this movie to thank for it. This cult classic is about a pair of friends who come in and out of each other's lives.

There's More Where That Came From: Sleepless in Seattle, You've Got Mail, Serendipity, and My Best Friend's Wedding.

Silver Linings Playbook ($4)

Two people returning to their lives after spending some time in mental facilities unexpectedly fall in love. Dance competitions, arguments, and steaminess ensue.

More Where That Came From: Greenberg, Liberal Arts, Crazy, Stupid, Love, and Love & Other Drugs.

Rushmore ($4)

This drama takes place on a prep school campus and explores the relationship between two men who both try to woo a first-grade teacher. Aside from the hilarious, quirky humor, Rushmore is stylistically and aesthetically delightful in signature Wes Anderson style.

There's More Where That Came From: Moonrise Kingdom, Punch Drunk Love, The Grand Budapest Hotel, and The Squid and the Whale.

10 Things I Hate About You

Sisters Kat (Julia Stiles) and Bianca couldn't be more different, and when their loving but overprotective dad forbids Bianca from having a boyfriend until Kat starts dating, things start to get interesting. Oh, and it stars young Heath Ledger as the hot throb, which is reason enough alone to watch it.

There's More Where That Came From: The Last Days of Disco, Never Been Kissed, She's All That, and Pretty in Pink.

For more romantic movies to stream, check out our favorites available on Netflix.

Opening Image: Adenorah