Why I Kind of, Sort of, Really Love Moving

Dana Covit

After two years in my current 1920s-built abode, I’m in the middle of a move. Before you go on feeling sorry for me, let me just flat-out say something: I’m not mad about it. Strange, I know.

When I tell anyone about the move, they almost always reply with “That’s so exciting!” followed quickly by a deep sigh and almost always a note of understood misery—“Ugh, moving is the worst! Good luck.” 

The truth is that I actually kind of, sort of really love moving. My reasons are more universal than idiosyncratic, and perhaps they’ll make your next relocation less of chore and instead a source of genuine enthusiasm. What a concept, right?

I love editing and streamlining my possessions.

As a shopper and lover of flea markets, with a soft spot for the thrill of the find, I tend to amass collections. Let’s call them that. During one period, I may be into vintage books, ceramics, or paper goods. Who knows? I also have never met a good deal I didn’t like. What this means for my various living spaces is that I tend to turn around one day and realize I have a lot of stuff. It can be overwhelming.

Even if you aren’t a shopper like me, you’re familiar with the pitfalls of the junk drawer and our human tendency to hold onto greeting cards, invites, and other such things for no good reason at all. Moving presents the much-needed opportunity to take a close look at all of the material possessions in your life—to sort things into keep, donate, or trash piles and then host a majorly epic yard sale. Nothing feels better than moving with a lighter load than you started out with. Especially if you can make a few bucks off of it.

It’s an opportunity to evolve your style and aesthetic.

A clean slate to refine your vision and knock it out of the park is something to get excited over. After you’ve unloaded some items that feel dated or no longer rock your world, you’ll have space to acquire some new pieces that really, really do. All of the sudden I get really into Pinterest, collecting my inspirations. I read design magazines and visit my favorite shops. The chance to start fresh and buy only what you love is pretty special.

You can apply your learnings to finding a new home.

Maybe your last apartment didn’t have a bathroom window and you realized—again and again, during every single shower—how much you wish it did. Now you know! Maybe you paid a little extra for kitchen square footage that you ultimately didn’t feel like you needed. Or maybe you lived close to some of your favorite shops and valued that access more than anything else. Like in less-than-perfect jobs or any failed relationship, moving apartments allows you to apply things you have learned about yourself and your needs to a new search. By deferring to your proclivities and preferences, you’ll likely find yourself moving into a space that speaks to you all the more.

Change is healthy.

I love my current apartment. It has natural light for days, a charm of old construction that makes me sigh with pleasure every time I open my individually paneled windows. I love the fig tree in the front yard and the little porch off of the living room that makes breakfast feel like vacation. But change, to me, is a good thing—no matter what. It reinvigorates my senses and perspective and reminds me that we are adaptable and evolving. It shakes my patterns and routines and forces me to reconsider and rebuild. Both of these things create space for improvement.

Full disclosure: I’m a bit of an optimist (though I like to think it’s tempered with healthy realism). Perhaps I’m predisposed to think of moving in this sunny, not-so-overwhelming light. But even if you aren’t, set the drag of packing up those boxes to a soundtrack and get in there. You may just find yourself looking forward to your next change of address.

Scroll to shop some moving must-haves.

How do you feel about moving? Tell us your thoughts, or about a recent moving experience, in the comments below!

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