I Tried the Marie Kondo of To-Do Lists, and This Is What Went Down

Sophie Miura

When it comes to organization, I’m type A through-and-through. An inbox with more than 10 emails at a time makes me stressed, a 20-minute queue at Trader Joe’s is my idea of hell, and I start every workday by writing down a fairly detailed to-do list. For me, organization isn’t trivial; it’s almost therapeutic, so when a colleague mentioned a productivity hack that people are calling “the Marie Kondo of to-do lists,” I had to know more.

It’s called bullet journaling, and the internet is going nuts over the über-organized system. “It fundamentally changed my life,” says Rebecca L., one of the many diehard fans who shares her gushing testimonial on the website. Holt J. adds that it “improved my physical and emotional health immensely.” Is this a to-do list or a Scientology manifesto? I wondered. It seemed extreme and almost cult-like, but I had to know what all the fuss was about (and why my humble list just didn’t cut it). So, being the intrepid reporter that I am, I plunged myself into the throes of bullet journaling. Here’s what happened when I tried out the task-list trend that promises to be the ultimate productivity hack.

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