5 Things to Talk About Today

Sacha Strebe
  • NASA has listed the top 18 houseplants that purify the air we breathe. While we love the greenery apart from the pop of color they provide, houseplants are a great, natural way to filter harmful airborne toxins and pollutants. But not all houseplants were created equal. A new NASA Clean Air Study has outlined them for us. Dwarf date palm, English ivy, and the humble snake plant are among the top air-filtering indoor plants, and you can find all of them your local garden store or flower shop. — Inhabit
     
  • It's time to say goodbye to Flash once and for all. Google has announced its Chrome browser will block all auto-playing Flash ads beginning in September. This means that any Flash content (such as ads or auto-playing videos on non-video websites) will be "automatically paused by default." If you still want to watch them, there is the option to click and play. — Ars Technic
     
  • When researchers attempted to reproduce the results of 100 experiments, the results were "fundamentally squishy." All of the experiements had been published in three prestigious psychology journals and "the failure rate surprised even the leaders of the project." While the results of these studies provide a great story, they usually can't be reproduced a second time. The new paper, titled "Estimating the Reproducibility of Psychological Science," was published Thursday in the journal Science, and took 270 researchers four years to reproduce the results of 100 experiments. — The Washington Post
     
  • Phenomenal self-healing skin can repair itself after a gunshot wound. The "Terminator-style skin" was developed by Timothy Scott from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and his team, and contains a "reactive liquid sandwiched between two polymer sheets." Apparently, when the skin is punctured, a "chemical called tributylborane in the liquid reacts with oxygen to make it harden, sealing the hole within seconds." — New Scientist
     
  • Jasmine Twitty, 25, has made history as the youngest judge in Easley, South Carolina. The young graduate of the College of Charleston—a member of the Upstate Network Young Professionals Board—is also the treasurer of civil rights organization Urban League of the Upstate. She was also recognized for working tirelessly to promote the development of young people and professionals. — The Culture

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