3 Ways Americans Dine Differently Than Europeans

Kelsey Clark

America's many stereotypes illustrate stark cultural differences between U.S. natives and our European counterparts. And while fast food, unhealthy eating habits, and hamburgers and hotdogs instantly spring to mind when considering American eating habits, there are far more interesting, less obvious differences in the way we consume food. Juliette Sander, an international student from London currently studying in the U.S., recently chronicled the many different eating habits she's observed while living stateside for Spoon University. The resulting list is a fascinating glimpse into the way people from other cultures view our American norms, not to mention a shocking reminder of just how indulgent our culture can be. In her own words, here are the three most surprising revelations: 

The cost of vegetables

"Something else I have noticed in America is the very high price of vegetables and fruits, and the very low price of processed food and fast foods. And then they wonder why Americans are getting fatter." 

Portion sizes

"Here, when asking for a small drink, expect what would be considered a medium or even large in Europe," writes Sander. "And don’t be surprised to see that some restaurants, fast food chains, and cafes do not even offer small sizes and skip straight to the regular. Small in America does not exist. Go big or go home."

Antisocial meals

"Americans are known to live faster than Europeans. They are always in a hurry, do everything quickly, and eating is no exception," she writes. "When Europeans will spend hours at the dinner table (think of the French who can spend up to three hours having lunch), Americans prefer fast food and big chains where you are fed in 10 minutes tops."

Head over to Spoon University for the full list of contrasting habits, and share your thoughts on American dining in the comments below.

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