3 Things You Should Never Do in a Job Interview

Dacy Knight

Job interviews are your chance to shine. The potential employer already liked what they saw on your résumé enough to call you in. Now it's time to meet face to face to see how well of a fit you'll be with the company, expand upon why you're right for the position, and showcase your persona.

When you first get the call to schedule the interview, you might be equal parts excited and nervous. In the time before your meeting, you'll concentrate on putting your right foot forward—dressing the part, determining topics you should cover and focus on, and preparing questions you should ask—but the things you shouldn't do are just as important as the things you should.

Inc. rounded up a list of 10 all-too-common mistakes people make during a job interview. We highlighted our top three, for you to study up before you head into your next interview.

Talk too much: People tend to talk too much when they get nervous. When it gets really bad—rambling to the point the interviewer doesn't have a chance to speak, or veering so off topic you've completely diffused to point of your message—it doesn't well in an interview. Prior to your sit-down, practice deep breathing exercises to calm your nerves, and be mindful to not speak beyond what you mean to say.

Talk too little: On the other hand, another extreme is just as negative. Giving one-word or even very brief answers to your interviewer's questions can be detrimental to your chances of scoring the job. You're communicating very little to the interviewer as well as possibly sending the message you're simply not interested. If you're the type who becomes reserved and shy when you're nervous, practice mock interviews with a friend or in front of a mirror.

Interrupt: It may happen once or twice by accident when you don't realize the interviewer is going to continue speaking. However, continually interrupting—whether you know what they're going to ask you or you get so excited about what you're going to say next that you blurt it out—is a huge interview no-no. Practice active listening while you're being interviewed, staying engaged with what your interviewer is saying, not distracting yourself by coming up with the next thing you're going to say.

Have some of your own advice for job interview etiquette? Share your tips with us in the comments.

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