7 Trends From the 2010s Interior Designers Hope to Never See Again

living room

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Another decade, another crop of design trends for the books. 

As we leave the 2010s in the rearview mirror and cruise into the 2020s, we can’t help but reflect about all the trends we’ve seen over the past few years. Sure, there were plenty of phenomenons that will go down in history for shaping this decade; however, the 2010s also boasted several fads we truly hope we never see again.

Below, five interior designers took a walk down memory lane—albeit a cringe-worthy one—and are sharing the design trends they hope never see the light of day again.

01 of 07

Goodbye, Granite

granite kitchen

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“This trend started a bit earlier than the 2010s but continued to rule in the beginning of the decade. While granite can be so beautiful, the ubiquity of the same color and pattern everywhere made it feel less special.” —Alessandra Wood, interior design expert and vice president of style at Modsy

02 of 07

Turn Back the Time on Oversized Clocks

rustic room

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“The farmhouse trend of oversized clocks is one I wouldn’t mind never seeing again. While they do provide texture and a 3D element to a large wall, they’re fairly one-note.” —Alessandra Wood

03 of 07

Move on Millennial Pink

millennial pink

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“I've never understood this color. It looks like pepto, and isn't flattering on your or your home.” —Gabriela Gargano, founder of Grisoro Designs

“The millennial grew up, we hope...so should you.” —Jonathan Rachman, celebrity Decorist designer

04 of 07

So Over Shiplap

farmhouse bathroom

Trinette Reed

“There is such a thing as too much of a good thing. A little shiplap accent is great, a whole house is just too much. Your home should feel timeless, not themed.” —Gabriela Gargano

05 of 07

Au Revoir, Word Art

word art

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“We’ve all seen it done to death at this point. I know it became a thing because it was a way to express yourself with a limited budget without feeling mass-produced, but I am ready to see the days of word art go away. Used very sparingly it can still be impactful, but more often than not it feels very DIY and bossy.” —Sarah Malek, owner and principal of BANDD Design

“‘Dream’, ‘Paris’ or ‘Kiss’. If you want to dream, then commit to fabulous wallpaper or real art. If you want Paris, go to Paris and buy a cool antique or vintage art piece from France and if you want to kiss....I'll leave it at that!” —Jonathan Rachman

We’ve all seen it done to death at this point. I know it became a thing because it was a way to express yourself with a limited budget without feeling mass-produced, but I am ready to see the days of word art go away.

06 of 07

Farewell, Farmhouse

rustic kitchen

Jodie Johnson/Stocksy

“While I enjoyed the neutral farmhouse trend, I’m ready to add in more color, pattern, and interesting accessories to my designs. Rustic signage, dried cotton, and galvanized metal all have their place, but I find that a mix of finishes and styles is far more telling of who actually lives in a space.” —Maggie Griffin, founder and lead designer of Maggie Griffin Design

07 of 07

Move Over, Matching Furniture

bedroom furniture

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“Furniture purchased in a set: The 2000s and 2010s saw the rise of big box stores simplifying the shopping process for the general consumer, but it also made everyone think everything had to match. Listen to me—your home will be much more interesting and beautiful without the nightstands perfectly matching the dresser!” —Sarah Malek

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