These 8 Bathroom Tile Trends Are Defining 2019—And There's Still Time to Try Them

Updated 04/18/19

Sara Tramp; DESIGN: Emily Henderson  

I spend a lot of time looking at well-designed bathrooms. I'm not saying this to brag, because that would be a weird thing to find satisfaction in. I'm simply stating it as a part of my work life. At MyDomaine, we like to know how trends are evolving in this small-but-vital space, and so staring at photos of bathrooms is routine. Honestly, it could be much, much worse. 

Over the first few months of 2019, the MyDomaine editors have noticed how bathroom tiles are slowly shifting away from what's become established—like, you guessed it, white subway tiles—and toward what's emerging as decidedly fresh. If you're considering an update to your bathroom before the year is up, we collected the eight bathroom tile trends we think will continue to gain traction from designers and DIYers alike. Read on to see which tired designs to skip and which ones to consider for a bathroom renovation that'll get current styles right.

Skip: White Subway Tiles

Try: Shaped or Textured Tiles

Textured Tiles—Bathroom Tiles
Sara Tramp; DESIGN: Emily Henderson  

It's true that white subway tiles are timeless, but they're also so beloved that their look can be seen as overdone. To give your bathroom a twist on this perennial trend, think about choosing white tiles with texture or shape. Just a minor change can completely update the finish.

Weathered White Tile—Bathroom Tiles
Clé Weathered White Zellige Subway Tile $20
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Skip: A Horizontal Layout

Try: A Vertical Layout

Vertical—Bathroom Tiles
 Sarah Sherman Samuel

If a horizontal layout tricks the eye into thinking that a space looks longer, then a vertical layout gives the appearance of more height—and it's also a welcome adjustment. Vertical layouts make vanities appear taller, especially when paired with trendy floating sinks. And if a shower is tucked away into a nook, then vertical tiles will make it feel more spacious. 

Modern Farmhouse Brick—Bathroom Tiles
Clé Modern Farmhouse Brick $10
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Skip: Staggered Tiles

Try: Stacked Tiles 

Stacked—Bathroom Tiles
Jeff Mindel; DESIGN: Studio DIY

There's a clean finish to stacking tiles rather than staggering them, as is usually the case with most traditional bathroom layouts. This also helps the space look more uniform so that other trendy finishes like brass fixtures and rounded vanities can complete a modern look.

White Liberty Brick—Bathroom Tiles
Clé White Liberty Brick $15
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Skip: Glossy Tiles

Try: Matte

Matte—Bathroom Tiles
Elizabeth Roberts Architecture and Design

Matte tiles have been overlooked in the past simply because glossy ones have a way of making this typically small space sparkle. But we'd argue that matte finishes are actually a better fit for a relaxed mood. Its softness will complement the glow of candles, and make the room feel calm in natural light. 

Matte Penny Rounds—Bathroom Tiles
Clé White Penny Round Matte Tiles $10
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Skip: Rectangular Tiles

Try: Hexagon Tiles 

Hex Tiles—Bathroom Tiles
 Sarah Sherman Samuel

The easiest way to put a twist on tile design is to change the shape, and hexagon pieces fit that mold. Since rectangles have become as predictable in bathrooms as faucets and mirrors, this option feels new without looking over the top. Spread them across the bathroom floor or use them on vanities and see how that aesthetic makes the room feel modern. 

Red Clay Solid Hex—Bathroom Tiles
Clé Red Clay Solid Hexagon Tile $15
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Skip: Monochrome

Try: Pattern

Pattern: Bathroom Tiles
Sara Tramp; DESIGN: Emily Henderson 

For those with bold design sensibilities, a bathroom can be the ideal place to experiment. So while you may have seen plenty of monochrome bathrooms in the recent past, now is the time to try a pattern. Pick tiles that have a graphic element, and as long as it's cohesive, it'll come off as looking sleek.  

Hex Pattern—Bathroom Tiles
Clé Encaustic Hexagon Cement Tile $10
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Skip: Herringbone

Try: Crosshatch 

Crosshatch—Bathroom Tiles
 Sarah Sherman Samuel

Herringbone tiles are a timeless design, but the crosshatch approach is yet another example of how a subtle switch can make a room feel fresh. Keep in mind that this look can appear busy if it's paired with too many competing features. As long as the rest of the bathroom is kept minimal, then the crosshatch will be a success.

Liberty Brick—Bathroom Tiles
Clé Greenwich Liberty Brick Subway Tile $15
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Skip: Containing Tiles

Try: Carrying Tiles Throughout

All Four Walls—Bathroom Tiles
Sara Tramp; DESIGN: Emily Henderson

It's common to choose one tile for a shower and yet another for the walls, but why not carry the same tile pattern throughout the room? This option makes it possible for a bathroom to appear more pulled together since the eye will travel more easily across the space. It also gives you a chance to be even more intentional with the tile you choose. 

New West Pattern—Bathroom Tiles
Clé New West Pattern Nine Tile $15
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