5 Books Billionaire CEOs Think Everyone Should Read Before They Die

Updated 01/31/18
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Reading more is one of the most popular New Year's resolutions, second to working out and eating healthy. If you're one of the countless people who've deemed 2018 the year of the paperback, consider the favorite books of America's top CEOs and business owners. As originally reported by Business Insider, Mark Zuckerberg, Marissa Mayer, Laura Lang, Steve Jobs, Abby Joseph Cohen, and Jeff Bezos have all verbally recommended the following five books, whether on Twitter or Facebook, in an interview, or in a personal blog post. If you're looking to gain some career wisdom in the New Year, add the following five books to your reading list:

Mark Zuckerberg: Portfolios of the Poor ($19)

"It's mind-blowing that almost half the world—almost 3 billion people—live on $2.50 a day or less," wrote Zuckerberg of his pick in a Facebook group for his 2015 book club, A Year of Books. "More than one billion people live on $1 a day or less. I hope reading this provides some insight into ways we can all work to support them better as well."

Marissa Mayer and Laura Lang: The Charisma Myth: How Anyone Can Master the Art and Science of Personal Magnetism ($13)
"Olivia Fox Cabane offers hands-on advice and a practical guide to humanizing leaders without comprising integrity or authority. She focused on the 'it' factors that can make a real difference," wrote Lang in a review of the book. Mayer also showed support for the book and author Cabane on Twitter.

Steve Jobs: The Innovator's Dilemma ($7)
Jobs referenced this book when speaking about the importance of Apple embracing cloud computing. "It's important that we make this transformation, because of what Clayton Christensen calls 'the innovator's dilemma,' where people who invent something are usually the last ones to see past it, and we certainly don't want to be left behind," quoted Walter Isaacson in his 2011 biography, Steve Jobs.

Abby Joseph Cohen: Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error ($10)
"Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error by Kathryn Schulz is a deceptively easy read which tackles one of the most critical issues for decision makers: understanding how we form opinions," wrote Cohen for Private Wealth. "Importantly, she discusses how to revise those opinions when new information becomes available, rather than clinging to earlier views."

Marissa Mayer and Laura Lang: The Charisma Myth: How Anyone Can Master the Art and Science of Personal Magnetism ($13)
"Olivia Fox Cabane offers hands-on advice and a practical guide to humanizing leaders without comprising integrity or authority. She focused on the 'it' factors that can make a real difference," wrote Lang in a review of the book. Mayer also showed support for the book and author Cabane on Twitter.

Steve Jobs: The Innovator's Dilemma ($7)
Jobs referenced this book when speaking about the importance of Apple embracing cloud computing. "It's important that we make this transformation, because of what Clayton Christensen calls 'the innovator's dilemma,' where people who invent something are usually the last ones to see past it, and we certainly don't want to be left behind," quoted Walter Isaacson in his 2011 biography, Steve Jobs.

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