Your Complete Guide to Growing and Caring for a Golden Pothos

golden pothos

@dangielina

Pothos are some of the most easy-to-care-for houseplants, and the golden pothos is no exception. If you're a beginning plant parent that's looking for a hard-to-kill, yet beautiful houseplant, look no further.

While there are several varieties of the pothos plant, the golden pothos is the most popular variety-and for good reason. This trailing, green and golden ivy is the gift that keeps on giving—without asking for too much of you in return. Golden pothos plants are very versatile: they are happy in low light as well as bright, indirect light. They are even content to dry out in between waterings. Translation: easy care.

Golden pothos are also air purifiers that work to remove toxins from your space, so you can sit back and relax knowing your golden pothos is happily helping to improve your space—physically and aesthetically.

golden pothos

@chicagogardener

  • Botanical Name: Epipremnum aureum
  • Common Name: Golden pothos, Devil's Ivy
  • Plant Type: Vine
  • Origin: Southeast Asia
  • Mature Size: Up to 10 feet long
  • Sun Exposure: Low to bright, indirect light
  • Soil Type: Well-drained potting mix
  • Soil pH: 6.1 to 6.5
  • Toxicity: Toxic to cats and dogs

Pothos Care

golden pothos

Anna_plants

Golden pothos are so, so easy to care for, which means you’ll only have to beware of giving them too much attention. When watering, allow the soil to dry out in between waterings. Golden pothos don’t like to sit in moist soil, so make sure your potting mix is well-draining, and check the moisture level with your fingers before giving it a drink.

If your pothos is in a lower light space, it will require less water than if it’s receiving more sunlight.

How do you know if you're watering your golden pothos the right amount? If its leaves are green and flowing, you're doing great. Leaves turning yellow are a sign that you’re watering it a bit too much, so cut back and check the soil moisture to make sure it's dry before your next watering.  If your golden pothos leaves are turning brown or wilting, give it a drink, and up the frequency of your waterings.

Best Growing Conditions for Golden Pothos

golden pothos

@urbanfoliagesociety

Your golden pothos can actually be happy in a variety of light situations, as long as it is not in direct sunlight—leave your windowsill for your succulents.  A lower-light space is tolerable for golden pothos, as well as a room filled with bright, indirect light.

Your golden pothos will be happy when potted in a well-draining soil planter, but they can also be happy in just a jar of water. Yes, golden pothos are so easy they don't even require soil. This makes them a perfect addition to a propagation station wall where they can happily live in water—just make sure to change it regularly. 

Temperature-wise, your golden pothos doesn’t thrive in harsh conditions, and likely prefers the temperature as you do, somewhere around 65-75 degrees Fahrenheit. It likes humidity but doesn't have to have a particularly humid environment to thrive.

Golden Pothos Varieties

golden pothos

@yourplantsista

Golden pothos is a variety of the pothos plant. It happens to be the easiest variety to care for and thus, the most popular. The golden pothos is identifiable by its heart-shaped leaves and green and yellow coloring.

Sometimes, pothos plants can be confused with heartleaf philodendron plants. While they both require a similar type of care, pothos plants tend to have larger, thicker leaves than their philodendron friends.

How to Propagate Golden Pothos

Golden Pothos Prop

@philopothos

Propagating golden pothos plants is such an easy task. You can propagate them in soil or water, just as you can grow golden pothos in soil or water. Simply cut a small portion of your vine that contains a leaf and a node and root it in water or soil. 

Common Growing Problems

golden pothos

@chroniclesof_cornwall

Golden pothos can exhibit beautiful, long vines, but if your plant is starting to look “leggy”—too much vine, not enough fullness at the base—you can trim a piece of your vine and root it back in the original container to help fill it out.


Article Sources
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  1. Golden Pothos. American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

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