5 Nutritionist-Approved Recipes That Help Prevent and Fight Cancer

Updated 01/29/19
Product Disclosure

With an estimated, 1.7 million new cases of cancer diagnosed last year in the U.S., it's safe to say that someone in your life has been touched by the disease. With so much information (and misinformation) online about what to do and how to fight cancer, it can be a veritable minefield for those who need answers after diagnosis or simply want to prevent the disease. One of the most powerful tools we have in our arsenal to fight and prevent cancer is diet. Certified nutritionists Sarah Grossman and Tamara Green specialize in cancer care cooking and have seen first hand the healing power of food.

The founders of Living Kitchen provide meal delivery and private chef services in their native Toronto bringing food to cancer patients and for those of us who are invested in cleaning up our diet and preventing disease. Since 2010, they have been helping patients with diseases such as cancer, IBS, colitis, Crohn's, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, depression, hormonal imbalance, obesity, and chronic fatigue, but in 2012, cancer support and prevention became the main focus of their practice.

Now they've launched a book titled The Living Kitchen: Healing Recipes to Support Your Body During Cancer Treatment and Recovery with 100 healthy cancer-fighting recipes. But this is so much more than just a cookbook. It's also an essential guide on cancer prevention and treatment using the healing power of food, from diagnosis to treatment to recovery. And the best part is all of these recipes are freezer-friendly. Ahead, Grossman and Green share five exclusive recipes from their new cookbook so you can get started on your journey at home, right now.

  

Dulse, Egg, and Avocado Special

Daniel Alexander ; Excerpted from The Living Kitchen by Tamara Green and Sarah Grossman. Copyright © 2019 Tamara Green and Sarah Grossman. Published by Appetite by Random House®, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved

"I always get so excited when someone tells me they love dulse! Although I know most people have never heard of this delicious, salty, and crispy-when-sautéed seaweed, I really believe it’s one of the tastiest and interesting foods out there, especially if you like salty, savory things, as I do. This recipe came to be when I got tired of eating plain old sunny-side-up eggs. The sauerkraut is an easy way to support your digestion and immune system, and dulse is the perfect complement to eggs, especially when you add avocado. Some even say it’s the best substitute for bacon, but you’ll have to try it for yourself and see!"

Makes: 1 serving
Prep time: 1 minute
Cook time: 7 minutes

Ingredients:

2 tsp ghee or extra-virgin olive oil
2 eggs
⅓ cup dried dulse
¼–½ avocado, sliced into thin strips
Large handful of sprouts
2–3 Tbsp sauerkraut 

Directions:

Heat a wide pan over medium heat. Add the ghee, swirling it around to coat the bottom. Carefully crack the eggs into the pan. Cook for two minutes on one side, until the white, is opaque. Then flip the eggs over and cook for another minute. We’re aiming for over-easy eggs, but if you need the yolk to be fully cooked, then leave them in the pan for another minute, or until the center is solid.
Remove the eggs from the pan and transfer to a plate. In the same pan, sauté the dulse for one to two minutes to crisp it up quickly.<br/>Place the dulse next to the eggs and add avocado, a handful of sprouts, and sauerkraut. Enjoy right away.

You can find dulse at health food stores or online. It usually comes in two- to three-inch-long pieces. Break them in half to make cooking easier.

Chutney and Coconut Red Lentil Soup

Chutney and Coconut Red Lentil Soup Recipe
Daniel Alexander ; Excerpted from The Living Kitchen by Tamara Green and Sarah Grossman. Copyright © 2019 Tamara Green and Sarah Grossman. Published by Appetite by Random House®, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved

"When I was younger, I spent some time in India and did a yoga teacher training course at an ashram there. They made a fresh coconut chutney that tasted out of this world, full of zesty fresh herbs and sweet coconut. Although I’ve never been able to replicate it exactly, it has inspired this recipe. This soup is comforting when you’re feeling tired and also packed with enough easy-to-digest protein to strengthen your body post-treatment. Our addition of the flavorful chutney takes this soup from basic to bold, but you can always omit this part of the recipe."

Makes: 6 servings
Freeze: 3-4 months
Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 30 minutes

Ingredients for the soup:

1 Tbsp virgin coconut oil
1 cup diced red onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 inches ginger root, peeled and grated
1 tsp coriander
1 tsp turmeric
½ tsp cumin
½ tsp garam masala (optional)
½ tsp sea salt
Pinch of pepper
14.5 oz can diced tomatoes
14 oz can full-fat coconut milk (set aside 3 Tbsp for the chutney)
3 cups Phyto, Organic Chicken, or Strong Bones Broth
3 cups 1-inch cubes of peeled and de-seeded butternut squash
1 cup dried red lentils, rinsed
Ingredients for the chutney:

½ cup fresh cilantro, loosely packed
½ cup fresh mint, loosely packed
⅓ cup unsweetened shredded coconut, lightly toasted 3 Tbsp full-fat coconut milk
2 tsp honey or maple syrup
1 lime, juiced
Pinch of sea salt

Directions: 

For the soup, place a large pot on the stove and heat the coconut oil over medium heat.
Add the onions and sauté for five minutes, or until translucent and soft.
Sauté the garlic, ginger, coriander, turmeric, cumin, garam masala, salt, and pepper. Stir well to coat the onions and garlic in the spices and cook for another
Add the diced tomatoes, coconut milk, broth, squash, and lentils, and mix well.
Cover the pot, bring to a boil, and then reduce to a simmer. Let cook for 30 minutes, or until the squash and lentils are soft and cooked through.

While the soup is simmering, blitz all the chutney ingredients in the food processor until the herbs are finely chopped.

Ladle the soup into bowls, scoop about two tablespoons of the chutney on top of each bowl of soup, and serve.

Store the chutney and soup separately in airtight containers in the fridge for up to five days. The soup can also be frozen for three to four months. The chutney is best eaten fresh, within four days of preparation.

Loaded Vegetable Salad

Daniel Alexander ; Excerpted from The Living Kitchen by Tamara Green and Sarah Grossman. Copyright © 2019 Tamara Green and Sarah Grossman. Published by Appetite by Random House®, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved

"We love a salad that has it all: loud colors, crunchy, soft, and juicy textures, and punchy, zippy, and sweet flavors. The Loaded Vegetable Salad is meant to be a 'use it all up' salad, meaning whatever you’ve got in the fridge, throw it in! You can use this recipe as the base and add whatever you want, or just follow the recipe as is, because it’s a good one. This is a filling salad since the vegetables are all bursting with fiber. You can make this into a meal by topping it with one of our meat or veggie burgers found in our omnivore mains or vegetarian mains recipe sections."

Makes: 2 large servings or 4 small servings
Prep time: 15-20 minutes

Ingredients for the salad:

2 cups de-stemmed and finely chopped kale
1½ cups sliced cucumber
1 cup thinly sliced purple cabbage
½ cup thinly sliced radishes (about 4 radishes)
½ cup diced red pepper (1 small red pepper)
1 carrot, peeled and julienned
½ avocado, diced
¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley

Ingredients for the toppings:
¼ cup broccoli sprouts
1 Tbsp raw sunflower seeds
1 Tbsp raw pumpkin seeds
1 Tbsp hemp seeds
Sunflower Seed “Caesar” Dressing 

Directions:

Toss all the chopped vegetables together in a big bowl.
Make the salad dressing in a separate jar.
Top the portion of salad you are eating immediately with the sprouts, seeds, and a drizzle of salad dressing, and enjoy.
Store leftover salad in an airtight container. It will keep in the fridge for up to five days.
Store the dressing in a glass jar and then dress salad when you’re ready to eat it again.

Lentil Shepherd’s Pie

Daniel Alexander ; Excerpted from The Living Kitchen by Tamara Green and Sarah Grossman. Copyright © 2019 Tamara Green and Sarah Grossman. Published by Appetite by Random House®, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved

"This is not your average shepherd’s pie. We use parsnips and cauliflower as the topping instead of white potatoes, and we also use potent immune-enhancing ingredients like shiitake mushrooms, garlic, our Phyto Broth, and high-fiber, protein-rich lentils. Make this dish when you have energy, then freeze it and reheat when you need a quick meal."

Ingredients for the topping:

1 head cauliflower, chopped into florets
2 parsnips, peeled and diced
2 Tbsp ghee, butter, or extra- virgin olive oil
½ tsp sea salt Pinch of pepper
Ingredients for the filling:


1 Tbsp ghee or extra-virgin olive oil
1 small yellow onion, diced 2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 carrots, peeled and diced
½ cup coarsely chopped shiitake mushrooms
2 celery stalks, diced
½ tsp dried thyme or 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
½ tsp sea salt Pinch of pepper
1 cup dried green lentils
2 cups Phyto Broth (page 119) or store-bought organic vegetable broth
3 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley

1 head cauliflower, chopped into florets
2 parsnips, peeled and diced
2 Tbsp ghee, butter, or extra- virgin olive oil
½ tsp sea salt Pinch of pepper
Ingredients for the filling:


1 Tbsp ghee or extra-virgin olive oil
1 small yellow onion, diced 2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 carrots, peeled and diced
½ cup coarsely chopped shiitake mushrooms
2 celery stalks, diced
½ tsp dried thyme or 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
½ tsp sea salt Pinch of pepper
1 cup dried green lentils
2 cups Phyto Broth (page 119) or store-bought organic vegetable broth
3 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley

Directions:

To make the topping, put the cauliflower and parsnips in a pot with ½ cup of water. Turn the heat to medium, cover the pot, and let simmer for 10–12 minutes, or until soft.
Place the steamed cauliflower and parsnips (along with any water that’s left in the pot), ghee, salt, and pepper in a food processor and blend until creamy. Alternatively, if you’re making this by hand, mash with a potato masher and mix together.
To make the filling, place a large pot on the stove over medium heat. Add the ghee, onions, garlic, carrots, mush- rooms, and celery. Sauté for 3 minutes, or until the onions are translucent, and then add the thyme, salt, and pepper.
Add the lentils to the pot, cover with broth, and bring to a boil. Then reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 30 min- utes. The lentils will be cooked through, and the liquid will be absorbed. Then stir in the fresh parsley.
Preheat the oven to 375°F and line a casserole dish with parchment paper. Spoon in the lentil filling and spread it evenly along the bottom of the dish, then top with the mashed cauliflower mixture. Flatten it with a spoon, mak- ing sure to spread the lentil filling to the edges of the dish.
Bake in the oven for 30 minutes, broiling for three minutes at the end so that the topping is set and lightly browned. You can keep in the fridge for four days or freeze the leftover pie for three to four months. It’s best to cut the pie and freeze it as individual portions for easy and quick reheating.

Creamy Tomato Soup

Daniel Alexander ; Excerpted from The Living Kitchen by Tamara Green and Sarah Grossman. Copyright © 2019 Tamara Green and Sarah Grossman. Published by Appetite by Random House®, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved

"I first made this soup on a whim one winter. My fridge was running low on produce, but there were just enough veggies hiding out in the bottom of the crisper drawer to create a new recipe that has become the go-to, quick, easy-to-make soup whenever my family is short on time but wants something delicious. The simmered tomatoes and carrots naturally taste slightly sweet and, combined with the coconut milk, make a creamy, comforting bowl of goodness that’s perfect for cold nights, or when your body could use a little post-treatment care."

Makes: 4-6 servings
Freeze: 3-4 months
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 35 minutes

Ingredients:

1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1⅓ cups yellow onion, diced
2 stalks celery, diced
3 cups carrots, peeled and diced
3 cups Phyto, Organic Chicken, or Strong Bones Broth
1 cup full-fat coconut milk
28 oz can diced tomatoes
¼ tsp sea salt

Extra Boosts:
¼ cup coarsely chopped fresh basil leaves
2 Tbsp hemp seeds or sunflower seeds

Directions:

Place a large pot on the stove and heat the olive oil over medium. Sauté the onions for five minutes, or until translucent.
Then add the celery, carrots, broth, coconut milk, diced tomatoes, and salt to the pot. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer, cover, and cook on low heat for 25 minutes.
Let the soup cool slightly and then carefully pour into a blender. Blend the soup until creamy. Be careful during this step because the soup will be very hot.
Start blending on low, hold the blender lid down firmly with a towel and don’t overfill it, then incrementally increase the speed.<br/>Garnish with basil and serve. Sprinkle hemp seeds or sunflower seeds on top for extra texture and protein.
5. Store in the fridge for up to four days or in the freezer for two to three months.

If you don’t have coconut milk, you can easily replace it with any other type of dairy-free milk. Just make sure it’s unsweetened and plain.
Chef's note:

If you don’t have coconut milk, you can easily replace it with any other type of dairy-free milk. Just make sure it’s unsweetened and plain.

Related Stories