The One Space You're Not Painting, But Should

painted ceiling

Sarah Fultz Interiors

 

As every designer knows, any blank space in a home is a new opportunity to flex your decorating muscles. However, there's one major area in every space that almost always remains untapped real estate. We're, of course, talking about the blank, white ceiling space hanging above all your impeccably curated rooms. And while it often remains forgotten, this neglected space is actually a key element of any design scheme.

To be sure you get the most use of your blank ceiling space, we tapped three design and paint experts to help you pick a hue that works for you. Ahead, the inspiration and tips you need to create a space that makes an impact from all angles

Make Your Ceiling The Focal Point

"Instead of dressing up a room with artwork or accessories, try painting a ceiling," Sue Kim, Color Marketing Manager for Valspar Paint tells MyDomaine. "This is a great way to bring in a personal touch and incorporate color." She adds that painting the ceiling "can help separate spaces without a wall for a sophisticated meditation nook or sitting area."

Think a visual room divider that takes up zero space. Yes please.

Dark Ceilings Make Your Room Look Taller

If you're going for the illusion of taller ceilings, Ashley Banbury, Senior Color Designer for HGTV HOME by Sherwin-Williams suggests going bold.

"Select a dark, bold shade when you're trying to make a room feel taller." She explains. "By keeping the wall color neutral and accenting the ceiling with a deep shade, you will draw the eyes up making the room feel taller and larger while adding interest."

Keeping Things Tonal Makes Your Room Look Expensive

"Paint is inexpensive, but it can add a lot of bang for your buck, especially if you use it to elevate the style of a room," says South Carolina-based interior designer, Caroline Brackett. "I often like washing a room in one color—including the ceiling, trim, and walls—especially in a high-gloss or lacquer finish."

You'll instantly be transported to the study room of a fancy estate, especially if you go for a deep emerald shade of green.

Color Blocking Blurs Lines Between Walls And The Ceiling

"Have fun with a color-blocking technique and bring the color partially down the walls," suggests Kim. "This will give an illusion that there are no ceiling lines or edges, making the design feel endless!"

Think a design that runs from the center of your ceiling down the side of your main wall. Major impact for not a lot of work.

Have fun with a color-blocking technique and bring the color partially down the walls. This will give an illusion that there are no ceiling lines or edges, making the design feel endless.

Match Vaulted Ceilings To Your Walls

It's important to always be mindful of the architecture of a room when deciding to paint your ceiling.

"If your ceiling is vaulted or angled, bring the wall color up on the walls to continue the height of the room while also complementing the architecture," Kim says. "By stopping the color on the walls, it can cut the room in half, making it feel smaller."

High Contrast Hues Highlight Outdated Ceiling Fans

"If there is a ceiling fan, be sure to make sure that there isn't too much contrast between the finish of the fan and the paint color," Brackett points out. Since some basic ceiling fans may feel outdated, painting the ceiling a drastically different shade will make it stand out more.

If You Go White, Be Sure It's Right

It's okay to keep a ceiling white if you're going for a minimal, airy feel. However, Ashley Banbury, Senior Color Designer for HGTV HOME by Sherwin-Williams notes you should always match whites.

"If your color palette in a space is a crisp and clean white, select the same white color that you have on the walls for the ceiling," Banbury says. "A slight variation in white shades can make one color look dull or muddy. By selecting the same shade, it will ensure a fresh clean look you're trying to achieve."

Play With Eye-Catching Paint Finishes

"I think that we are going to see more texture on ceilings in 2020," Brackett tells MyDomaine. However, she's not talking about that unsightly popcorn texture you usually find in older homes. She's envisioning "shiny lacquer finishes, textured wallpaper, and metallics" will be all the rage next year. If you want our advice, we suggest you get on these trends before everyone else does.

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