Turns Out Dish Soap Doesn't Actually Clean Your Cutting Board

It's no surprise that the kitchen is one of the most germ-ridden parts of the house. The refrigerator handle apparently harbors more bacteria than the floor, and the dirtiest item in your home is the one you use to clean with: that soggy kitchen-sink sponge. 

Even if you're religious about replacing your sponge, it turns out that recently washed cutting board isn't as clean as you think. According to The Mirror, dish soap actually does nothing to remove bacteria from a wooden board. "While washing up liquid works well on nearly everything else, it does nothing for chopping boards," the publication reveals. Expert Home Tips editor Stephanie explains that the liquid can't penetrate the surface of the item, thus leaving behind bacteria from raw meat and other food products, which could contaminate your next meal. 

Instead, they call for a cleaning product that's a little more heavy duty than common dish soap. "Soaking chopping boards in bleach after every use will ensure they are properly sterile, thus preventing any risk of bacteria transfer," she recommends. 

Spring-Cleaning Essentials for Your Tidiest Home Yet

Sounds a little extreme, right? Do you use dish soap or bleach to clean your cutting boards?