These Foolproof Methods Give You Perfect Soft Boiled Eggs Every Time

soft boiled eggs

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Of all the ways to eat an egg, soft-boiled is perhaps the tastiest and most Instagrammable (in my humble opinion). They are an ideal companion to savory ramen dishes, a great hit of protein on top of salads or avocado toast, or even just enjoyed on their own. Though the perfect soft-boiled egg may seem hard to execute, all it takes is a timer and a little confidence.

Here's what you need to look for: A perfect soft-boiled egg consists of a spoonable, loosely custardy yolk encased in a firm, set white. They’re a bit jammy, warm all the way through, and ideal for serving up in cute, tiny egg cups—that you may, or may not, already own.

So, without further ado, here are two foolproof methods to making brunch worthy soft-boiled eggs.

The Submerge and Simmer Method

  1. Fill a small pot or saucepan with water, cover, and bring to a boil over high heat. Once the water is boiling, turn the heat to low to maintain a simmer and season with some salt. The salt will help keep the egg shells from cracking as they move around the pot.
  2. Gently lower a large egg (or up to four large eggs) into the pot with a spoon and set a timer for six and a half minutes (seven minutes if boiling four eggs).
  3. While the egg boils, prepare a bowl with cold water and ice.
  4. Once the timer goes off, turn off the heat and use a spoon to transfer the eggs from the pot to the bowl of ice water. Let chill for about two minutes. You can also simply let the eggs sit under cold, running water for about 30 seconds.
  5. To serve sliced, crack the egg shell gently all around, then peel, and slice in half lengthwise or serve in a ramekin. To serve in an egg cup, set the egg in the cup and use the back of a spoon to gently crack the pointed end of the egg. Remove the cracked shell and some of the white to expose the soft yolk.

The Steam Method

  1. Add about one inch of water to a small pot or saucepan, cover, and bring to a boil over high heat. Once the water is boiling, add a large egg (or up to as many eggs as can fit in a single layer in the pot), cover, and set a timer for six minutes.
  2. While the egg boils, prepare a bowl with cold water and ice.
  3. Once the timer goes off, turn off the heat and use a spoon to transfer the eggs from the pot to the bowl of ice water. Let chill for about two minutes. You can also simply let the eggs sit under cold, running water for about 30 seconds.
  4. To serve sliced, crack the egg shell gently all around, then peel, and slice in half lengthwise or serve in a ramekin. To serve in an egg cup, set the egg in the cup and use the back of a spoon to gently crack the pointed end of the egg. Remove the cracked shell and some of the white to expose the soft yolk.

How to Store Soft-Boiled Eggs

I’m a fan of all things time saving or prep ahead, and I bet you are too, right? It might go without saying, but soft-boiled eggs (just like hard-boiled) can be prepped ahead and stored in the fridge. After boiling them, let them sit in the ice water until cooled all the way through.

Remember to use a timer when boiling your eggs to get the perfect consistency.

Dry and store them in their shells in an airtight container in the fridge for up to three days. Reheat using the steam method outlined above, setting your timer for three minutes instead of six. Then enjoy on top of salads, as a sandwich, or on its own.

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