Is This the Next Big Kitchen Trend?

Updated 09/23/16

Tell us what your dream kitchen looks like and we will tell you who you are. Are you an avid baker, a serial entertainer, or a workaholic? A recent survey conducted by Houzz, a home renovation site, suggests that remodel trends are increasingly repositioning the kitchen as a multifunctional high-traffic space. Kitchens, which used to serve purely as functional spaces to cook and prepare food, are now becoming central hubs that bring people together in modern homes.

According to the survey, "homeowners are renovating their kitchens to create a super kitchen that not only serves multiple purposes but also incorporates features, functions, and décor traditionally associated with other rooms, dramatically blurring the lines between the kitchen and other living spaces." A staggering 69% of the 2400 surveyed homeowners said they used their kitchen for eating and dining, while 49% entertained in the space. Among the popular features added in U.S. kitchens in the past year are TVs, workspaces, and dining tables.

To help you plan your next remodel, we've rounded up our favorite open-plan kitchens filled with great tips on how to re-create the look in your own home. Get ready to pin to your dream house board.

Courtesy of Gachot Studios

Open-plan kitchens are becoming the norm as homes become smaller. Many communal living spaces now serve multiple purposes, so it's only natural that kitchens fall in the same track. An oversize island can easily double as cooking station, homework table, and breakfast bar. It can also serve as extra storage.

Olivier Amsellem , design by Rodolphe Parente

The tried-and-trusted breakfast nook is also going through a revival period, being reinterpreted in contemporary ways that read less Mad Men kitchen and more as elegant, laid-back dining spaces. In this Parisian kitchen, an oversize banquette sits underneath a window, creating the perfect casual dining experience.

Courtesy of Elizabeth Roberts

In this loft space in Brooklyn's Williamsburg neighborhood, the entire living area opens into the kitchen, giving this family a chance to spend more time together and providing a great entertaining space for larger groups.

Courtesy of Elizabeth Roberts

A corkboard on the wall provides a space for children's artwork, report cards, and other important paperwork. As most people now work off smaller laptops, the kitchen island can also double as a workspace, as long as paperwork can be digitized or tucked away.

Courtesy of Gachot Studios

Comfortable counter stools encourage people to spend more time in the kitchen. Upholstered stools with a supportive backrest are more inviting, creating a space where people want to lounge and linger.

Carlos Muntadas via Nuevo Estilo

In this Barcelona kitchen, part of the island was dedicated to dining by opening up the space underneath the countertop. This is a great alternative to traditional dining tables, especially in small spaces.

Courtesy of Emerick Architects

In this stunning Seattle loft, the owners opted for an industrial-style island and a large conservatory-style dining table that can seat up to 14 people. The space feels connected yet is large enough to accommodate varied groups. This is ideal for frequent entertainers.

Courtesy of Per Jansson

Instead of the more common island with barstools setup, this smaller Scandinavian kitchen features an extra-narrow island space. The rest of the kitchen doubles as a formal dining room. Artwork makes the space feel more layered and less sterile.

Shannon McGrath , design by Hecker Guthrie

Some homeowners still love keeping their kitchen and dining room separate. A great alternative is to divide the space with large steel-framed doors, which provide visual separation but still keep the two spaces connected.

Courtesy of Roman and Williams

In this gorgeous New York kitchen where space is limited, the counter stools were removed in lieu of more storage space. The other end of the kitchen doubles as a dining room, while a bay window sets the scene for a dreamy breakfast nook.

Courtesy of Elizabeth Roberts

In smaller kitchens, islands often double as dining space and counter space, making spaces feel more open yet providing separation between living areas. Layered finishes blend the kitchen as just another decorated living space. As we are increasingly moving toward micro-living spaces—especially in urban areas—the super kitchen is only getting smarter and more sophisticated.

Iittala Piano 5-Piece Place Setting $100
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Cutipol Goa Cutlery $89
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West Elm Matte Black Flatware Set $39
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Lawson-Fenning Orsini Bartsool $1325
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Tolix Marais Counter Stool $385
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CB2 Roadhouse Black Leather Bar Stools $269
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Michael Robbins Dining Table $999
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Knoll Saarinen Oval Dining Table $5233
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CB2 Revel Extension Dining Table $1299
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BoBo Intriguing Objects Mod Kitchen Island $2599
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CB2 Go-Cart Stainless Rolling Console Table $369
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Williams-Sonoma Travis Kitchen Double Island $2995
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