How to Carve Out a Meditation Space In Your Home (Because We Could All Use One These Days)

Mediation Room

Design: Meg Lavalette, Photo: Christian Torres

Your home should always be a place of calm, your safe space, an oasis in the middle of a hectic world, but that doesn't mean chaos can't take over some of your home's most high-traffic areas. When you need a minute of zen, we suggest you turn to a dedicated space where you can clear your mind, focus on your breathing, and leave the stresses of the world (and your other rooms) behind. Whether you have a tiny corner to dedicate or an entire room to spare, here's how to create a meditation space that will have you saying namaste in no time. And because there's a lot to escape right now, we even brought in reinforcements to weigh in.

When you have a room or space dedicated to meditation, it becomes a sacred place, and sitting there makes it easier to get into a sacred state.

Yogmata Keiko Aikawa is the first female and non-Indian Siddha Master to reach the ultimate state of meditative consciousness. She has worked with figures such as the Dalai Lama 14th and celebrities like Madonna and Paul McCartney. Aikawa tells us, "meditation is the practice of [clearing your thoughts], which creates a state of stillness, and quiets and cleanses the mind." She explains it's a much-needed reset for our overworked minds and bodies and says benefits include higher productivity, more energy, better concentration, organized thoughts, and the ability to kick bad habits.

Meet the Expert

The first female and non-Indian Siddha Master to reach the ultimate state of meditative consciousness, who has worked with figures such as the Dalai Lama 14th and celebrities like Madonna and Paul McCartney.

To get into the right headspace, Aikawa says, "it's good to sit where there's no one else around, in a quiet, clean place. When you have a room or space dedicated to meditation, it becomes a sacred place, and sitting there makes it easier to get into a sacred state." So how does one go about creating their sacred space? We tapped holistic interior designer Gala Magriñá, founder and principal of New-York-based design firm Gala Magriñá Design. She shares three important elements for creating zen in any amount of square footage. "It doesn't have to be an entire room—it's really about carving out a small, simple, quiet, inspiring space for yourself—even an armchair by a window works."

Meet the Expert

Holistic interior designer Gala Magriñá, founder and principal of New-York-based design firm Gala Magriñá Design.

Decor Elements: Color

"Color deeply affects us," says Magriñá, "and for more relaxed, meditative states, soft tonal colors work best." She suggests steering clear of bright, energizing colors and sticking to warm whites, light greys, and light earthy colors. She also tells us, "light wood, wide plank floors with muted walls to bring in the sense of lightness and serenity."

Decor Elements: Texture

Magriñá recommends loading up on soft textures, cushions, and blankets, not just because they're cozy, but because "plush objects are considered to be more Yin, which is associated with softer, calmer feminine energy (as opposed to Yang, which is considered a more vibrant, masculine energy).

Decor Elements: Light

Research has shown that the amount and type of lighting directly affect concentration, appetite, and mood, among other aspects of daily life. Magriñá suggests installing dimmers and keeping your favorite candle nearby, saying, "it's a wonderful and super restorative way [to enhance your meditation]."

Decor Elements: Final Touches

Aikawa and Magriñá both suggest finding a comfortable floor cushion to help you settle into your meditation. An air purifier or plants can also be an amazing addition to clear the air in your space. Magriñá makes a good point, saying, "a lot of meditation practices require deep breathing, so this is great for breathwork." And speaking of breathing, a diffuser or scented candle with calming scents like lavender and eucalyptus can work wonders for your mood. Finally, a few framed photos tie your meditation room together. Aikawa says, "you can use the pictures of great spiritual teachers of history or pictures of nature," while Magriñá says framed affirmations help you "visualize or work on manifesting something you want, so when you come out of meditating, those things are right in front of you as a gentle reminder."

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