Over-Represented: How to Ensure Your Future Is Set Up for Success

Updated 05/15/19

Introducing: Over-Represented, a series developed to ensure women are the future. As advancements in technology continue to change the way we work, we will explore what to study, areas to up-skill, and how to gain the right experience to ensure women are over-represented in jobs of the future.

When it comes to what careers of the future might look like, forecasters are predicting traditional jobs as we know them are on the way out. No surprises there. There are a few facts we know to be certain about women in the workforce. We currently make up 46.9 percent of the working population in Australia, and on average we are paid 15.3 percent less than men (that’s around $253.70 per week). Sydney Morning Herald reports we won't hit pay parity for at least 50 years. 

As technology continues to advance at lightening speed, it is inevitably changing the day-to-day of how we work. In fact, according to forecasts by Dell Technologies, by 2030, 85 percent of jobs have not yet been invented. So, let's take matters into our own hands. In order to safeguard our futures, we need to think beyond annual goal setting, and start mapping where our skills need to develop in order to be properly equipped for the jobs of the future. Our bet? We'll hit pay parity faster if women are over-represented in the roles that have not yet been invented.

We may not know exactly what lies ahead, however we know advancements in technology are making way for flexibility and the way we learn.

While it’s an easy quip to say "the robots will soon take over" as we wait for the unknown, a more beneficial use of our time is to forecast as far as 2050 and understand what direction our workplaces are heading. But before we take it that far, here's a little explainer of how we will be helping you safeguard your future. In this series we will interview female pioneers who are experts in their fields, dissecting their expertise and looking at how we can apply this to our own careers. We will speak to academics, entrepreneurs, and venture capitalists—basically as many experts as we can, so you're armed with the knowledge you need. At a recent conference, Changing The Ratio, we heard Sally-Ann Williams, Google's engineering community and outreach manager, speak to the importance of women studying STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering, and maths). Williams spoke of a simple equation—STEM study plus your passion, will equal success. 

When it comes to high-yield, remunerative roles of the future the Australian government encourages women to explore the worlds of STEM and entrepreneurship. It is predicted that this field is "associated with 75 percent of the fastest growing occupations, innovations and higher paying jobs"—it’s also worth noting that males currently make up 84 percent of all persons with STEM qualifications at this stage. Further, the government predicts that "Australia will rely on STEM skills and innovation to support future economic growth.”

As we start to explore what the future could look like, it’s also important to understand the reality of what women face today. Maternity leave and childcare oftentimes hinder the ability for careers to press forward. Our lives outside the workplace are important to consider as we set ourselves up for success.

According to the Towards Report research: "Ensuring affordable, accessible and flexible child care, improving workplace diversity and flexibility, supporting women to innovate, succeed as entrepreneurs and thrive in jobs of the future, strengthening women’s economic security, and enhancing financial incentives to work" are the key drivers women are looking for in any workplace. No matter what industry you work in, that balance and support are the essential ingredients to a woman's success. We all have to work harder at really meaning it when we talk about flexibility.

So, we invite you to join us as we take a step into the future. We will be taking you through areas to study, upskill, reskill, and retrain in order to be competitive within the roles that will not only drive our economy, but the evolution of humanity. We want you to be over-represented in the jobs of the future. 

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